Who can participate in the GMO corn suits against Syngenta? – Individuals, trusts, partnerships, corporations?

  • Individual farmers, who have seen their corn income lost by virtue of the catastrophic drop in corn prices during crop years 2013 and 2014, may participate in this suit.
  • Likewise, landowners whose land they rent on a share crop basis have been similarly harmed by Syngenta’s actions. Moreover, a landowner leasing his or her land with a cash rent payment has been damaged if the drop in corn prices causes a drop in rental income during subsequent crop seasons.
  • Whoever operates a farm damaged by Syngenta’s actions is a Plaintiff who should file a lawsuit against Syngenta.
  • Individuals, Trustees, General Partners or Corporate Officers have the power to bind their legal entities, and therefore, to contract with any attorney to bring suit on that particular farming entity’s behalf.

Any entity directly losing money as a result of the drop in corn prices during 2013 and 2014 may bring suit against Syngenta. An individual farming his own land may bring suit against Syngenta for his or her lost corn income during these crop years. After all, a farmer producing 100,000 bushels would have been paid $702,000 prior to June 10, 2013, and only $325,000 a year later. This farmer has a claim against Syngenta for his loss of $377,000 as a result of its actions.

Likewise, landowners whose land has been rented on a share crop basis have been similarly harmed by Syngenta’s actions. If a landlord is to be paid 50% of the crop grown by the farmer, the drop in corn prices caused by Syngenta’s actions has caused a loss to the landlord in the amount of 50% of the total expected lost corn income. Moreover, a landowner leasing his or her land with a cash rent payment has been damaged once the drop in corn prices causes a drop in rental income during subsequent crop seasons.
Whoever operates the farm damaged by Syngenta’s actions is the Plaintiff who should file a lawsuit against Syngenta. Individuals, Trustees, General Partners or Corporate Officers have the power to bind their legal entities, and therefore, to contract with any attorney to bring suit on behalf of that particular farming entity.

In this regard, over 7,000 farmers and grain elevators have already retained us, as of April 15, 2015. Some are individuals farming their own land. Some are the trustees of family trusts, established by the forefathers of present farm operators. Some are general partners of family limited partnerships, established by now-deceased relatives with the foresight and wisdom to protect the family farm from the inheritance tax collector. Likewise, if a farm is operated within a corporation, the corporation’s officers or directors can then sign a contract hiring a lawyer to pursue the corporation’s claims here against Syngenta.

Written by*:
Mikal C. Watts
WATTS GUERRA, LLP
Four Dominion Drive, Bldg. Three, Suite 100
San Antonio, Texas 78257

* This information is provided to supply relevant information concerning the GMO corn lawsuit, and should not be received as legal advice. Legal advice is only given to persons or entities with whom Watts Guerra LLP has established an attorney-client relationship. If you have another lawyer in the GMO Corn lawsuit, you should consult with your own attorney, and rely upon his or her advice, rather than the information contained herein.

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